How to make your company page stand out on LinkedIn

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Within the social media ecosystem, LinkedIn may not have the most sizzle but it can deliver lots of value for small business owners looking to enhance their digital footprints. One way to get the most bang out of your LinkedIn buck is by showcasing your company page.

To be honest, the company page probably does not receive a lot of attention from SMBs. If anything, many SMBs may create a company page, add a few details, and let it collect dust.

The problem with this laissez-faire approach is it scratches the surface of what company pages can do for you. Yes, it lets a SMB say it has a company page but it’s like having an automobile with no frills – no power locks, no air-conditioning, no power windows, etc. In other words, you are simply going through the motions as opposed to squeezing out a lot of value.

Follow these tips to LinkedIn company page success:

  1. If your SMB does not have a company page already, step one is obvious: create a company page. Use an interesting or eye-catching cover image to create a good first impression.
  2. If your business has different products, services or campaigns, create Showcase Pages. These are extensions of your company page, and they can be used to focus on specific topics and/or target audiences. There is a limit of 10 Showcase pages for a parent company page.
  3. On each Showcase Page, add a description, Website links and images. Each page can also have a specific administrator so you can make an individual responsible for its operations.
  4. Company pages are SEO-friendly so use keyword-rich sentences in your corporate profile, as well as words and phrases that describe your business, expertise or industry focus.
  5. Make sure all your employees include your company on their LinkedIn profiles, as well as email signatures. Encourage them to become brand evangelists by sharing content and updates with their networks on LinkedIn.
  6. From the company page, share industry updates, insight and relevant content on a regular basis, including links. Be useful and interesting by sharing content (your own and third-party content) that educates or entertains in some way.
  7. When posting updates, include an image. A big colourful image can attract the eye and boost your visibility.
  8. A particularly useful feature is being able to share updates to specific audiences – industry, seniority, geography or job function. This allows you to deliver targeted campaigns, rather than a one-size-fits-all approach
  9. Engage with your audience. Asking question is a great starting point for engagement. For instance, , HootSuite posted an update that asked its followers to share the social media story that was most memorable to them during the year.
  10. On a regular basis, check your analytics to see how your updates are resonating. You can see clicks, likes, comments, followers acquired and engagement on your updates.

What else can you do on your LinkedIn page?

  • To attract talent, you can post jobs on a company page. This is a paid service, which starts at $385.95 for a 30-day posting. There are discounts for multiple job packages.
  • Add the “follow” button to your site so people can receive notifications about updates and new content.
  • While not part of how a company page operates, it is also a good idea to post blog posts on LinkedIn. Make sure you include corporate links. You can then share these blog posts via the company page. The more helpful your blogs are, the better. Readers want tips, listicles, how-to’s, anything that can make them more productive in their careers.

With some effort and time, it is fairly easy for an SMB to establish a vibrant company page on LinkedIn. Like anything, it is a matter of working at it every day to promote your presence and become part of the community.

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Mark Evans

Mark Evans

Mark Evans help startups and fast-growing companies tell better stories (aka marketing). His strength is delivering “foundational” strategic and tactical services, specifically core messaging, brand positioning, marketing strategies and content creation. Find him via his blog