Oracle launches data-as-a-service for B2B marketers

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Data is a major asset that business owners are becoming increasingly aware of, and enterprise companies such as Oracle are striving to find better ways to use it.

In July 2014 the enterprise software giant launched its Data-as-a-Service product (DaaS), an extension of Oracle Cloud. It empowers businesses to harness vast amounts of data to make smarter prospecting strategies and ultimately grow their profits.

On March 16, Oracle took DaaS one step further by releasing even more data sets, only these ones are targeted at the B2B space. DaaS already provided access to over 1 billion anonymous global profiles and over 700 million social messages from various feeds coming from various social media and news sites.

The B2B data set release adds another 300 million anonymous profiles, and includes 200 different targeting attributes allowing users to refine highly specific searches tailored to their campaigns.

We spoke with Pieter De Temmerman, Oracle Data Cloud VP, to find out a little more about what this new release means for B2B marketers.

“We make data available in a variety of different ways that allow enterprises to plug that data into a variety of different use cases, primarily through things like API integrations which is where DaaS really comes into the category,” says De Temmerman.

“To power things like marketing with this B2B data, like for example a mobile campaign or a display campaign, we have a product called the Audience Data Marketplace where all this data is brought together and made available for marketers to use in the campaigns they want to run,” he added.

The creation of these data sets is largely thanks to the April 2014 acquisition of BlueKai, a cloud-based data platform. The addition of BlueKai brought together many elements that made DaaS possible. As time goes on, we can expect to see Oracle add more and more data sets to its cloud-base service.

With DaaS, B2B marketers can use the available data in a variety of ways to generate better leads, and to specifically target the decision makers who could potentially buy their product. For example, you could search for people with a specific job title, or for companies of a specific size.

Late last year, Oracle also added intent-focused data sets from Madison Logic Data. Using this, marketers can find companies who are looking for what they have to offer and this can be a powerful tool in sussing out strong sales leads. The Madison Logic partnership is just one addition to the DaaS data sets that B2B marketers might be interested in.

“We have this partnership with Dunn and Bradstreet that gives us access to around 100 million professionals, and 240 million companies. It’s another use case of B2B data, and the idea of being able to fly this data to various use cases is something that we’re very excited about,” says De Temmerman.

“We’re focused on powering enterprises to leverage data across all their different use cases, whether it’s marketing, whether its sales teams trying to optimize their serum database, whether it’s the service team trying to learn more about the custom. It’s really more about a broader initiative within oracle,” he notes.

The DaaS platform has turned up some interesting results for many companies already. For example, one financial services company managed to increase its sales by 200 per cent. It is beginning to look more and more like harnessing the power of big data is becoming more practical, and even essential, to get ahead in the business world.

 Photo of Pieter De Temmerman via Oracle

 

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