The Most Important Security Is Your Employees’ Safety

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In business, security is a word which will always carry some weight. There’s the issue of financial security, which underpins every decision made on the monetary side of the business. Cybersecurity, too, is an essential component of any business’s plans in an age where a single data breach can be ruinous to a business and to the privacy of its customers. However, probably the paramount security consideration is one that often goes unremarked upon. That is, the security of your workforce.

Every day, workers around the world get up and go to their place of business to do a job for which they are paid; they fulfil duties as contracted, and are remunerated for this. However, it’s often ignored that part of having that job means leaving the safety of their home to travel to and enter that place of work. While they are there, they are the responsibility of their employers – and if you want to show you are a conscientious employer, it’s not a bad idea to show that you are going to every length possible to ensure your workers are protected.

Getting to and from the office

While increasing numbers of people are working from home – and this is something that may persist in many cases even post-pandemic – there are some cases where this has not been possible and some are still having to commute. While you can’t control the traffic on the roads, there are ways to ensure this commute is as safe as possible. For employees who do not or cannot drive, consider offering a car or coach service that gets them direct to the door rather than expecting them to navigate what can be a hazardous walk from the nearest bus stop. Also, look into workarounds when inclement weather makes travel a risky proposition.

Security around the premises

A lot of thought goes into protecting what is inside a business premises, with alarm systems and anti-theft measures designed to dissuade crimes of acquisition. Off the premises, this level of security isn’t always maintained, and individuals can pose a more personal threat to your employees. 

A hard and fast rule about not letting people on to the premises without security clearance, backed up with passes and control consoles, is a good way to ensure that stalkers and harassers will not be able to threaten your employees. Don’t let anyone without express permission loiter beyond the outer limit of the car park and – again – consider arranging a car to take home any employee who needs to walk beyond that limit particularly if they’re leaving work after dark has fallen.

Consider your approach to disgruntled customers

If you’ve ever worked the phones in a customer service call center, the overwhelming likelihood is that you’ll have dealt with a customer who lets their anger be known right from the beginning of a call. Sometimes their rage will be merited, but it’s never the fault of the person handling the call, and there should be a clear protocol in place for dealing with such customers. 

If you’ve ever had a customer ask for your full name, it’s worth bearing in mind the kind of information that can be found out with a person’s full name, their employer name, their location and the whole internet to search. Most disgruntled customers will simply want their complaint settled, but consider that there are those who feel they have a larger ax to grind; don’t let your employees become a target of their vendetta.

Your employees are your most valuable resource, and they merit all the protection your premises and equipment benefit from and more. The above are just some of the things to bear in mind so that they can work in safety.

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Adam Tanton

Adam Tanton

Adam is a partner in B2BNN with over 15 years experience in the enterprise technology field.