App of the Month: Scribblepost

scribblepost
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Do you write your to-do list on scraps of paper? Do you use Evernote to track followup items? Do you use your email to collaborate on projects? Stop.

Paul Berkovic and Alon Novy founded Scribblepost. It is a new type of productivity software, a productivity network. They started with a Founding Member Program, so productivity-conscious people like me, were given early access to the tool. How else can an editor stay on top of an editorial calendar, social calendars, products, and projects for different clients, different companies, and staff members?

ScribblePost lets you track and manage everything you’re working on – notes, tasks, projects, and emails, all in one place. It lets you collaborate productively with anyone, even people who don’t use ScribblePost. They call this idea ‘borderless collaboration’.

Simply put, Scribblepost makes getting things done easier, by solving a few problems. [1]

Email is not a productivity tool. Email is just not built for tracking and managing stuff that needs to get done. It is a communication tool.

So we use other tools to try and keep track of all of the action items in our emails, like note takers, task managers, or project management systems. Typically, individuals use between 3-6 different productivity tools to manage their work (Outlook, Google Docs, CoSchedule, Hootsuite, Evernote, Box, Dropbox…)

Productivity silos. Most productivity tools only cater to personal productivity, or at most to an internal team. The reality is, most of our work interacts with a broader network of people: clients, vendors, freelancers, partners, and contractors.

Productivity tools aren’t productive. Existing productivity tools have ‘fill in the form’ design paradigms, so when you try to manage your work it’s cumbersome and time consuming. Do you think the same way about every task? No. Those structures break your train of thought and slow you down.

ScribblePost is modelled on the way people naturally scribble notes on paper. There is no friction when capturing information (there are no forms or fields). They call this idea ‘frictionless data capture’.

Key Features

  1. Clean Interface

I hate clutter, though you’d never know it by the way my desk looks. My virtual desktop however, needs to be clean and clutter free, or I can’t think. Scribblepost is like that.

scribblepost interface

 

  1. Searchable Tags

Personalize this to whatever you like. I have things I regularly look for, as you likely do too. Tag your projects with #ClientName or #ProjectName and see how easy it is to keep track of status.

scribblepost tags

 

  1. Workflow

Scribblepost comes with workflow tags embedded, for #today, #tomorrow, #someday, #important (and others). Connect with your email, and assign dates to tasks, so you never lose track again. You’ll be able to see your priorities, AND those assigned to other people on the project team.

scribblepost workflow

You’ll also get daily reminders of what’s coming up, and what’s #overdue.

 

  1. Mobile app

Ideas don’t always come to me when sitting at my laptop. Most often, they hit me at the most inopportune times. Instead of sending myself an email, or an Outlook task reminder, or a “Note” on my smartphone, I can add those moments of brilliance to the Scribblepost app, to whatever project I’m thinking about.

scribblepost mobile 

The developers of Scribblepost are constantly updating and upgrading functionality, and making the app available across more platforms. Who knows what 2017 will bring!

Join now online at Scribblepost, or download the app for iOS or Android.

 

[1] https://www.quora.com/What-is-ScribblePost

 

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Kris Schulze

Kris Schulze

Executive Editor at B2B News Network
Kris is a Certified Content Marketing Specialist with a degree in languages, and too many years of experience in marketing and media to mention. Kris has spent her career collecting knowledge in content and product marketing, writing, and working for some well known brands. She is the author of Welcome to Beansville, and In the Quiet Hours.