KPMG serves sushi and wine to discuss supply chains and capital spending with B2B firms

KPMG TV spot The Entree
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The road from uncertainty to opportunity could be a pretty daunting journey for a lot of companies, so in KPMG’s latest TV commercial, Joie Chen is making sure her guests have the kind of meal that will sustain them along the way.

In ‘Food For Thought,” the consulting giant has the broadcast journalist convene a roundtable-style discussion over shrimp at Kenzo Estate, a Napa Valley winery, about the massive changes place in terms of globalization and trade. Big changes in international tax codes, for example, can bring about difficulties in cross-border purchasing and fulfillment, but KPMG exec suggested that their enterprise clients should also look for some silver linings.

“If you had greater visibility into your supply chain, you could meet some of those customer demands, but you could also have visibility into how you could flex the supply chain in a changing global environment,” says Brett Weaver, a KPMG partner.

 

 

Others at the table include Laura Behrens Wu, CEO and co-founder of a shipping software company called Shippo, who talks about how technology can help reduce supply chain inefficiencies. Meanwhile Terry Howerton, CEO of venture firm Technexus, explores the potential to “spin” capital into improvements in R&D.

“Food For Thought” is actually the eleventh episode in a series called “The Entree,” which has explored themes of innovation, disruption and more. The clips, which tend to run for a minute and a half vs. the standard 30-second TV spot, are produced by KPMG’s agency, Jack Morton.

 

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Shane Schick

Shane Schick

Shane Schick is the Editor-in-Chief of B2B News Network. He is the former Editor-in-Chief of Marketing magazine and has also been Vice-President, Content & Community (Editor-in-Chief), at IT World Canada, a technology columnist with the Globe and Mail and was the founding editor of ITBusiness.ca. Shane has been recognized for journalistic excellence by the Canadian Advanced Technology Alliance and the Canadian Online Publishing Awards.